1. Reblogged from: au-mexique
  2. Reblogged from: au-mexique
  3. rockford1:

    Mayan ruins at Copan

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  4. flying-steamboats:

    Aztec Double Headed Serpent Mosaic Sculpture

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  5. ancientart:

    Mesoamerican jaguar sculpture,

    The Jaguar was one of the mythological creations of the cultures of the Gulf Coast, the Olmec were the first to bring the animal to such high levels and was accepted by other cultures like Teotihuacan and the Mexica.

    Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photos taken by Travis S.

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  6. blackpaint20:

Mayan Pre-Columbian art in the National Gallery of Victoria Vera Cruz; Head showing life and death
 300-600 bc

    blackpaint20:

    Mayan Pre-Columbian art in the National Gallery of Victoria Vera Cruz; Head showing life and death

    300-600 bc

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  7. snowonredearth:

Jaina Woman by Ilhuicamina on Flickr.
    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  8. ancientart:

Sculpture of Xolotl.

An important figure within the rituals surrounding the god Quetzalcoatl is Xolotl, his twin, a peculiar god in the form of a dog, identifiable by the many wrinkles on the sacred canine and the two rectangular protuberances on its head, relating it with the heavenly fire.
According to legend, to create man Quetzalcoatl traveled to the underworld to search for the bones of the ancestral generations, guarded over by Mictlantecuhtli; Quetzalcoatl had to take on the appearance of a dog to carry out this mission. And hairless, reddish dogs called xoloitzcuintli lead the dead on their journey to Mictlan.
Xolotl is the god of monstrosities and the patron of twins and animals that undergo transformations such as tadpoles that turn into frogs. Xolotl is also the planet Venus, the evening star, and is the companion and twin of Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli, Venus as the Morning Star, identified with Quetzalcoatl. (NMA)

Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photo taken by Travis S.

    ancientart:

    Sculpture of Xolotl.

    An important figure within the rituals surrounding the god Quetzalcoatl is Xolotl, his twin, a peculiar god in the form of a dog, identifiable by the many wrinkles on the sacred canine and the two rectangular protuberances on its head, relating it with the heavenly fire.

    According to legend, to create man Quetzalcoatl traveled to the underworld to search for the bones of the ancestral generations, guarded over by Mictlantecuhtli; Quetzalcoatl had to take on the appearance of a dog to carry out this mission. And hairless, reddish dogs called xoloitzcuintli lead the dead on their journey to Mictlan.

    Xolotl is the god of monstrosities and the patron of twins and animals that undergo transformations such as tadpoles that turn into frogs. Xolotl is also the planet Venus, the evening star, and is the companion and twin of Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli, Venus as the Morning Star, identified with Quetzalcoatl. (NMA)

    Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photo taken by Travis S.

    Reblogged from: heycharade
  9. Reblogged from: au-mexique
  10. ancientart:

    The Codex Zouche-Nuttall, Mixtec writing, Late Postclassic period, from Mexico.

    It is one of three codices that record the genealogies, alliances and conquests of several 11th- and 12th-century rulers of a small Mixtec city-state in highland Oaxaca, the Tilantongo kingdom, especially under the leadership of the warrior Lord Eight Deer Jaguar Claw (who died early twelfth century at the age of fifty-two).

    Artifact statement from the the British Museum:

    This is one of a small number of known Mexican codices (screenfold manuscript books) dating to pre-Hispanic times. It is made of deer skin and comprises 47 leaves. The Codex contains two narratives: one side of the document relates the history of important centres in the Mixtec region, while the other, starting at the opposite end, records the genealogy, marriages and political and military feats of the Mixtec ruler, Eight Deer Jaguar-Claw. This ruler is depicted at top centre, next to his calendric name (8 circles and a deer’s head).

    Very few Mesoamerican pictorial documents have survived destruction and it is not clear how the Codex Zouche-Nuttall reached Europe. In 1859 it turned up in a Dominican monastery in Florence. Years later, Sir Robert Curzon, 14th Baron Zouche (1810-73), loaned it to The British Museum. His books and manuscripts were inherited by his sister, who donated the Codex to the Museum in 1917. The Codex was first published by Zelia Nuttall in 1902.

    Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo credits: Michel waldallaschildblog

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  11. virtual-artifacts:

Funerary Urn, Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec Culture

    virtual-artifacts:

    Funerary Urn, Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec Culture

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  12. archaeoart:

Chichén Itzá circa 1889.

    archaeoart:

    Chichén Itzá circa 1889.

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  13. hideback:

    Claude-Joseph Désiré Charnay (French, 1828-1915)

    Albumen prints, Mayan ruins of Mexico

    • Maison Du Nain, Uxmal. (1862-1863)
    • Palais Des Nonnes, Uxmal. (1862-1863)
    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  14. fuckyeahmexico:

Antes y Después. Palenque
(Aprende mas acerca de Palenque aqui)
reneraro submitted

    fuckyeahmexico:

    Antes y Después. Palenque

    (Aprende mas acerca de Palenque aqui)

    submitted

    Reblogged from: au-mexique
  15. webofhistory:

Ancient Native American City Discovered
    Reblogged from: webofhistory
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