1. Ceramic model of a pole ceremony. Nayarit, Mexico. 200 B.C. - A.D. 500.

    Ceramic model of a pole ceremony. Nayarit, Mexico. 200 B.C. - A.D. 500.

  2. Carved alabaster bowl from Honduras. Ulúa Valley, Maya, 600-900.

    Carved alabaster bowl from Honduras. Ulúa Valley, Maya, 600-900.

  3. Temple Model with Female Figure and Dwarves. Mexico, Jaina, Maya, A.D. 600-900.

    Temple Model with Female Figure and Dwarves. Mexico, Jaina, Maya, A.D. 600-900.

  4. ancient-mesoamerica:

Deer Head Mask
Veracruz, AD 600-900 (Late Classic)
Earthenware, Post-fire paint
Fanciful headdresses were an essential component of performance costumes because they were crucial to the dancers’ perceived transformation into the personage or spirit being in whose guise they performed. In Veracruz, figurines depicting warriors and a wide variety of performers often wear full-head masks, which can be removed to reveal the person inside, such as the amazingly detailed head-mask of a deer. Post-fire paint adorns the animal, with black-line curvilinear motifs on his long ear and bright blue-green pigment embellishing his upper lip. Large protuberances on his snout and the single horn atop his head suggest a composite zoomorph rather than a biologically accurate rendering. The deer was an important Mesoamerican food source, and its hide was used for a variety of purposes including the wrapping of ritual bundles and as leaves (pages) for screen-fold manuscripts which contained all manner of knowledge-from history to religious mythology to astrology and astronomy. The deer also was the animal spirit form of the mother of the seminal Mexican deity Quetzalcóatl and of the wife of the maize god among the Classic Maya.
http://art.thewalters.org/detail/80157

    ancient-mesoamerica:

    Deer Head Mask

    Veracruz, AD 600-900 (Late Classic)

    Earthenware, Post-fire paint

    Fanciful headdresses were an essential component of performance costumes because they were crucial to the dancers’ perceived transformation into the personage or spirit being in whose guise they performed. In Veracruz, figurines depicting warriors and a wide variety of performers often wear full-head masks, which can be removed to reveal the person inside, such as the amazingly detailed head-mask of a deer. Post-fire paint adorns the animal, with black-line curvilinear motifs on his long ear and bright blue-green pigment embellishing his upper lip. Large protuberances on his snout and the single horn atop his head suggest a composite zoomorph rather than a biologically accurate rendering. The deer was an important Mesoamerican food source, and its hide was used for a variety of purposes including the wrapping of ritual bundles and as leaves (pages) for screen-fold manuscripts which contained all manner of knowledge-from history to religious mythology to astrology and astronomy. The deer also was the animal spirit form of the mother of the seminal Mexican deity Quetzalcóatl and of the wife of the maize god among the Classic Maya.

    http://art.thewalters.org/detail/80157


    Reblogged from: ancient-mesoamerica
  5. I am Dr. Christopher Beekman. AMA about Formative to Classic period West Mexico. • /r/AskHistorians

    Check it out! Ask some questions!

  6. Ball court model. Shaft tomb culture/Teuchitlan Tradition. Nayarit, Mexico. 200 BCE - 500 CE

  7. Censer of Fire God Quetzalpapalotl. Mexico, Teotihuacan, Teotihuacán, A.D. 200-700.

  8. Shield. Mexico, Mixteca-Puebla Style, A.D. 1200-1400. Wood and shell
  9. Shield. Mexico, Western Oaxaca, Mixtec-Puebla Style, A.D. 1200-1500. Wood, shell, resin adhesive.
  10. AMA Announcement - Dr. Christopher Beekman will be here to answer questions about ancient West Mexico next Friday from 4:00pm-7:00pm MST • /r/AskHistorians

    Check. It. Out.

  11. fishstickmonkey:




Mask



Mexico, Gulf Coast, Veracruz, Olmec, 1000-600 B.C.
Jewelry and Adornments; masks
Jadeite with traces of cinnabar
Height: 4 in. (10.16 cm)
LACMA

    fishstickmonkey:

    Mask

    Mexico, Gulf Coast, Veracruz, Olmec, 1000-600 B.C.

    Jewelry and Adornments; masks
    Jadeite with traces of cinnabar
    Height: 4 in. (10.16 cm)
    Reblogged from: heycharade
  12. Hohokam ball court. Wupatki Pueblo in Wupatki National Monument, Arizona. Preclassic Period.
  13. Processional Scene (Men Carrying Pulque Jars), shaft tomb culture or Teuchitlan tradition, Jalisco

  14. Mother and child pair, shaft tomb culture, Ameca-Etzatlán style, Jalisco, 100 BCE-200CE

    .

    The Walters Art Museum narrative

    A mother proudly supports her male child who, with her help, stands securely on her lap. She sits in the proper position for women: legs folded to the side and concealed below her wrap skirt. This cream-slipped sculpture was made during the culmination of the shaft tomb tradition in West Mexico, when tombs were filled with spirited figural sculptures and decorated pottery vessels, and the bodies of the deceased were dressed in fine clothing and jewelry of shell and stone. The figures’ cream-slipped surface and the restrained painting with which her dress is depicted are characteristic of an artistic substyle of the famous El Arenal Brown sculptural tradition of northern Jalisco. Jalisco’s pottery sculptors created a vast array of figures portraying all manner of social and political personages. The figures are famous for the renderings of warriors brandishing shields and club-weapons and wearing helmets and armor of cotton batting. Others portray members of the ruling elite majestically standing with staff of office in hand. Shamans and healing rites were frequently depicted, as were individuals afflicted with diseases or congenital deformities. Portrayals of women were equally prominent, the majority featuring either their political or spiritual, shamanic powers or their magical ability to create life in the form of children. This sculpture is a particularly informal yet stately expression of the procreative power of women and their lifelong calling as nurturers.

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